The Hebrew Alphabet Notes by Dr. Honora M. Finkelstein Stan Tenen, a researcher of Jewish origin, has discovered some really incredible things about the Hebrew alphabet and the Book of Genesis. Stan says that he had never looked at the Bible after he made his bar mitzvah at the age of 13 until he had an “awakening” experience on a visit to Jerusalem. In the meantime he had become a computer programmer and a “pattern recognizer.” When he picked up the Hebrew Bible and looked at the first passage of Genesis, his first reaction was that it didn’t look like language. He saw that there was a pattern in it, and he became intrigued with playing with the pattern, attempting to break the code. There are 22 letters in the Hebrew alphabet, plus five letters that are used as final consonants, for a total of 27 letters. And there are 27 letters in the first passage in Genesis. Eventually it was suggested to Stan that he use base three mathematics to break the code; so he put the letters of the alphabet on a Rubic’s cube and cut away all the letters that were not in the first passage of Genesis. And he came up with a perfect geometric form; the statistical odds against such a thing being the case are astronomically high. To make a very involved story as brief as possible, eventually he came up with a mathematical formula generated by the alphabet that itself generated a spiraling geometric shape that you can see on Tenan’s web site (see address below). Following an esoteric suggestion about all things being generated by a “light in the meeting tent,” he hung the shape (the light or flame) upside down in a pyramid (the meeting tent) and shown a light on it, and as he did so from 27 different directions, he discovered the letters of the Hebrew alphabet were generated in shadow form. He refers to these shadow letters as “flame letters.” As he continued to work with the Hebrew alphabet and the Book of Genesis, he was often visited by an old rabbi. The rabbi would say, “You’re doing wonderful work, Stan; I really admire it. Do you say your prayers?” And Stan would reply, “I’m not orthodox; I don’t say my prayers.” And the old rabbi would go away. And some months later he’d come back again and say, “You’re doing wonderful work, Stan; I really admire it. Do you say your prayers?” And Stan would reply, “I’m not orthodox; I don’t say my prayers.” And the old rabbi would go away. One day as the old rabbi was admiring his work and asking if he said his prayers, Stan decided to do so just to make the rabbi be quiet. Now, when Hebrew men pray, they tie leather straps around their hands called tefillin (as well as a little box tied by straps to the center of the forehead—the third eye center). As Stan began to make the traditional hand gestures of the prayers, he realized that the straps on his hands were forming the shapes of the Hebrew letters—i.e., that the Hebrew alphabet is actually in our hands. He says that was the day he decided he had to become an orthodox Jew. If you’d like to learn more about the mystical connection between the Hebrew alphabet and the Bible, you can review Stan’s continuing research at www.meru.org. Made with Xara Website by Susan Smily